Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Guest Bloggers’ Category

Tavis Smiley, how much am I enjoying a moderator that takes no slack whatsoever! I liked the 1 minute format though I think maybe the 30 second is a bit too hard. I liked the variety I was hearing during the 1 min. Especially when the candidates were building on each other.

I think next time we should setup a twitter like microblog interface as it is difficult to keep up without it with this current format!

Read Full Post »

Can Gravel answer a question without first criticizing someone? My money says no. And as far as abolishing the income tax for a consumption tax is concerned, is it just me or would that aggravate the situation? If there is a poor family who spends every cent they earn, living paycheck-to-paycheck, wouldn’t they be taxed heavier as a percent than someone who is rich and doesn’t?

I think Hillary was best on the tax issue. Reforming the payroll tax would do more to help the working class than anything else.

Read Full Post »

I’m not sure why, on the topic of HIV/AIDS, no one talked about comprehensive sex education. For me, accesability to comprehensive sex eduaction is one of the biggest factors in the prevention of STDs. Why no one touched abstience-only education is confusing to me.

And again, what is Gravel talking about? How did he get to the war on drugs again?

Read Full Post »

Gov. Richardson’s line that ‘people don’t ask how we are going to get the money for the war’ referencing education spending was the best applause line of the night so far from here. I don’t understand why Democrats don’t hit on points like this more outside of Presidental Forums. I really think this it is on topics such as education that they really shine.

Again, I like Sen. Edwards’ multifacted answer.

Read Full Post »

Tavis’s show at PBS is now begining and it’s talking about the “Covenant with Black America.” The G21 team here, Allaina and I are Blogging on the event. It turns our that Yours Unruly is a celeb because I’m the only working journalist at the event. I was interviewed by a reporter from the University of Texas newspaper, The Daily Texan, therefore and a couple of people wanted to know about my writing at Slashdot.org.

So now we get into Tavis’s night, the All-America Forum.

The candidates are talking and Hillary gets first crack. Very prepared, as usual, after all she has the best teacher in politics around living with her in New York. Joe Biden comes up next but we all know nobody is taking him seriously. (Hate to be snarky but I know this game, as I said earlier.) Man, I hate to feel like a writer from Wonkette, but I’d love to have a shot right now. I’d like to make a shot game: have a shot when any candidate brings up the word “race.” Let’s face it, since Smiley is running this show, you could have one heck of a party. Snored through Bill Richardson and now I’m listening to “Smiling John” Edwards. In one ear. Now Barack is talking. This should be his shining hour.

Read Full Post »

I think the first question of a forum is one of the biggest; it sets the tone. I like the question; while not nessecarily the hardest question, it gives the canadates the ability to show how much they have thought about the issue. Though just about every canadate got in their nessecary talking-points, there were some good answers. I particularly liked Sen. Edwards’ answer. Not only did he talk about people of color, he talked to the need to help the underpriviledged of all colors.

As far as the worst answer to the question is concerned, Sen Gravel gets the nod. I don’t understand how his answer was germane to the question, and neither did the majority of the audience. It sounded like he was saying that the majority of addicts in America are African Americans and they need to face up to the problem as it if was the African American communty’s fault.

Read Full Post »

We’ve got just over 25 people in Carver Library. About 3/4 appear to be African American.

Dennis Kucinich’s response to the first question has so far brought the most positive murmurs from our group. Given that Kucinich is the candidate who often makes the most radical and inflammatory statements, and is seen as a truthteller, I am unsurprised.

Read Full Post »

The group is asked how they have helped others secure productive futures. Vicki Bradley shares her experience as a social worker moving people from a state institution into group homes to become independent members of society. Jesse Anderson notes how important it is to have a sense of place rather than just mindless busy work to occupy people. He is a graduate student at UT Austin interested in environmental sustainability and feels everyone deserves the benefits now reserved for the upper classes. He states architects should be more invested in providing for regular people. Steve Bradley brings up the mayor of Austin, an architect spearheading programs to make the city energy neutral. This spawns a discourse on local architecture and how architects can take a large role in securing a viable future for our world.

Read Full Post »

Our citizen group discussion discusses how to achieve success for one’s children. Passing on successful advice is difficult when success is so difficult to achieve as a minority.

Do mentoring programs work? Richard in Austin, who runs a mentoring program, says they do. If we demand success from them, they learn to demand more from us.

A., who grew in in Texas barrios/ghettos told his father that he wanted to be like him. His father told him “You’ve got to be better than me.” If you don’t push yourself, you won’t make it, he says.

Read Full Post »

I am all on-board with the idea of a convenant with oppressed people, but at the same time I hope people are not pushed away from the name of the movement. As a white man who has grown up going to ‘black schools’ with lower income families, whose parents never went to college, and who has strugged economically and socially, I feel pulled towards the Black Covenant in a major way; while I have not felt the disrespect of racial profiling, for example, I have faced the many of the problems in regards to inner-city poverty. I just hope the movement has room for me even though I am not black.

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »