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Archive for the ‘LBJ Library’ Category

Acting Archivist of the United States Adrienne Thomas announced today the appointment of presidential historian Mark K. Updegrove as the new Director of the Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum. His appointment is effective October 11, 2009.

(View full press release…)

Biography

Presidential historian Mark Updegrove, who will become Director of the LBJ Library & Museum on October 11, 2009, will serve as the Library’s fourth Director in its thirty-eight year history.

Updegrove is an award-winning author with over two decades of leadership experience within top media and communications organizations including Time, Newsweek, and Yahoo.

Often called on by the news media to offer commentary on the presidency, CNN has called Updegrove one of the “country’s best presidential historians.” Most recently, Updegrove was interviewed for a news story about President Barack Obama’s sliding poll numbers on ABC’s Good Morning America on September 2, 2009.

Updegrove is the author of two books relating to American presidents:

  • Published in January 2009, Baptism By Fire: Eight Presidents Who Took Office in Times of Crisis examines eight presidents who took office in times of unprecedented crisis, how they dealt the burdens they inherited, the role of character in their leadership, and the lessons those men provide for President Barack Obama.

“Memo to President Obama: Read this book.”
The Associated Press, January 2009

“Updegrove’s gallery of greats should instill hope and confidence in our future.”
The New York Times Book Review, January 20, 2009

  • Second Acts: Presidential Lives and Legacies After the White House, published in 2006, looks at the post-presidential lives of our modern presidents–Harry Truman through Bill Clinton–and includes exclusive interviews with former Presidents George H.W. Bush, Jimmy Carter, and Gerald Ford. The book was awarded ForeWord Magazine‘s “Book of the Year” Silver Medal Award for Political Science.

“A lively and highly readable review of [the] post-Oval Office years of the United States’ last nine former chief executive & entertaining and illuminating.”
The Washington Post, October 15, 2006

“Highly recommended.”
The Library Journal, July 6, 2006

Updegrove has also written feature articles for American Heritage, The Nation, Time, and Worth, and has contributed op-ed pieces for numerous national and regional newspapers and websites.

Additionally, he conceived and co-developed “Time and the Presidency,” a multi-media program featuring Time photographs of President Franklin Roosevelt through Clinton, along with reflections from Time‘s Hugh Sidey. The LBJ Library & Museum displayed the program’s traveling exhibit in 2000.

Updegrove has been Director of Business Development at Rawle Murdy, a private communications firm. He has also served as Vice President and Head of Sales and Operations at Yahoo! Canada; Vice President and Publisher of Nickelodeon Magazine and MTV Magazine; U. S. Publisher of Newsweek; and spent eleven years in several leadership roles at Time, Inc. including Los Angeles Manager of Time and President of Time Canada, Time’s Canadian edition and operation.

Updegrove graduated from the University of Maryland with a Bachelor of Arts in Economics in 1984. He and his wife, Evie, have two children, Charlie, 9, and Tallie, 3. The Updegrove family will be moving to Austin from Charleston, South Carolina.

Please join me in welcoming Mr. Updegrove and his family to the

LBJ Presidential Library and to Texas!

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When: Exhibit opens October 10, 2009
Exhibit runs through February 15, 2010 (Presidents Day)
Contact: Anne Wheeler, Communications Director
(O) 721-0216 (Cell) 731-2351 anne.wheeler@nara.gov

(Austin) – Our modern Presidents received educations and participated in school activities in ways as diverse as their backgrounds and political philosophies.

Through the records of the presidential libraries – archival material, museum objects, photographs, and audio-visual recordings – “School House to White House” gives visitors a new perspective on the presidency. The exhibit, prepared by the National Archives and Records Administration, charts the educational experiences of our Presidents from Herbert Hoover to Bill Clinton.

Whether in private school or public, whether growing up in a small town or a large city, each of our modern Presidents experienced a unique education that prepared him for leadership in the highest elected office in the land.

Lyndon Johnson
Johnson’s mother, Rebekah, taught the future President to read by the age of four and he attended public school in Johnson City, Texas. He enjoyed playing baseball and he participated in a two-person debate team that won the county title during his senior year of high school. Johnson attended Southwest Texas State Teachers College (now Texas State University) in San Marcos, Texas. Johnson, often called the “Teacher President”, taught school in South Texas and was also a high school debate coach. The federal education building in Washington, D. C. is named in his honor.

Highlights of LBJ memorabilia in the exhibit include:

– A letter sweater similar to one worn by LBJ as a college student at Southwest Texas State Teachers College

– 1930 graduation program from that College, the year LBJ was graduated.

– A letter written in 1927 from LBJ to his grandmother discussing his participation in the college debate team.

– The future President’s third-grade report card.

– A list of education-related bills passed during the Johnson Administration.

In this exhibit, visitors will learn which sports the presidents played, what kind of homework and grades the presidents were given, how classrooms were organized, family involvement in their learning experiences, and finally, that anyone can grow up to be President of the United States.

Exhibit Presidential facts you may not know:

– Herbert Hoover was the youngest member of the first class at Stanford University where he studied geology.

– Franklin Roosevelt managed the baseball team while a student at Harvard University.

– As a senior at Harvard University, John F. Kennedy wrote a thesis entitled “Appeasement at Munich”, which was later published as the book Why England Slept.

– Richard Nixon played violin, clarinet, saxophone, piano, and accordion.

-While a student at Yale University, George H. W. Bush was captain of the baseball team which played in the first two College World Series.Bush met the legendary Babe Ruth.

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If you haven’t visited the First Lady’s Gallery lately, now is the time to make your way over to the LBJ Library to see the new photo mural that the museum staff just installed. I’m so glad that I’ll be in working from the LBJ Library in Austin tomorrow. The Gallery will be my first stop!

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[edited 8.7.09 to correct typos I made to Carolyn’s letter. Sorry, Carolyn!]

Carolyn Lipka from West Windsor-Plainsboro High School, North, in New Jersey, one of our researchers who worked with Barbara Cline, received 1st place in the National History Day senior individual documentary category for her documentary:  “Legislation By Johnson:  Man and Moment.”  She received a gold medal and the History Channel Prize of $5,000.00; she has sent us a DVD of her documentary.

It’s easy to see why she won! Unfortunately, copyright laws prohibit me from posting her winning video, but trust me when I say that her documentary is a testimony to the importance of this event and the LBJ Library’s annual participation every February. Check out the extensive resources made available by the LBJ Library’s Education Specialist who does a yeoman’s job every year as host of the Central Texas Region History Day Competition!

Here are some snippets from her letter to LBJ Library Archivist Barbara Cline notifying her about winning the prize.

In my time at the LBJ Library I learned more than in the entirety of my other research.  I was afforded the opportunity to interview Luci Johnson; I was granted access to innumerable boxes of original archives, including daily diaries and oral histories.  One of my favorite things to do while I was there was looking through the extensive collection of political cartoons…”

“The taped conversations of Lyndon Johnson are a truly unique resource, but one which can be overwhelming.  Your assistance, in particular, helped me make sense of the voluminous recordings.  They wound up forming a vital part of my documentary.  My experience working with a generous and extremely knowledgeable staff of dedicated archivists such as your self gave me a great appreciation for the work of the LBJ Library…

“Because I am now aware of the great and important work of the Library, I plan on making a contribution to the LBJ Library.  I have used many research facilities over the past several years, and I came away from the LBJ Library with a feeling of gratitude that I was able to experience it.”

“I really appreciate all that you have done for my project, and I hope you enjoy ten minutes all about the immensely complex, fascinating giant that was Lyndon Johnson.”

Congratulations Carolyn. Please come back anytime and keep making those documentaries. We expect to hear more great things from you in the future!

Anyone else out there want to use our resources to tell a story? Check out our resources for researchers.

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On February 18, Dr. Betty Sue Flowers, director of the LBJ Library announced her resignation. The full post is below, but what is particularly relevant to the readers of this blog is Dr. Flowers’ leadership in establishing Texas Forums as an initiative of the LBJ Library six years ago.

It was October 2002 when I walked into her office to discuss deliberative forums as a possible offering for the LBJ Library. In true “Betty Sue fashion”, she only needed to hear two sentences before proclaiming, “yes, these forums will be one of the legacies of the LBJ Library. They are a direct fulfillment of one of the presidential libraries’ missions: to foster civic engagement.”

Just a few weeks later, I was privileged to enjoy a Sunday brunch at the Old Pecan Street Cafe with Betty Sue and four high-powered women. We discovered a common concern over the lack of opportunities for citizens to participate in the political conversations about important and, often, divisive issues that affect our every day lives. Out of this common concern, Texas Forums was born in January 2003.

If you recall the time, we were in the early stage talk about going to war in Iraq. We launched forums on Americans’ Role in the World in partnership with KLRU and were overwhelmed by the number of people who wanted to learn to moderate and participate in these difficult conversations. A sentiment expressed by many participants went something like this, “I know what I believe, but I desperately want to engage with those who think differently. I don’t want this to divide us. I want to reach out and understand.” People did not necessarily change their opinion about the war. But they did reach a new understanding and empathy for those who thought differently. That’s quite a legacy.

Betty Sue learns about One Latop Per Child from Joshua Gay at the We are All Actors event

Betty Sue learns about One Latop Per Child from Joshua Gay at the We are All Actors event

Texas Forums is not just a program of the LBJ Library to Betty Sue. Deliberative forums and a connection to the Kettering Foundation were already a legacy of the LBJ Library under Harry Middleton, long-time library director, and former staff member and close confidant to President Johnson. Betty Sue built on this legacy and moved civic discourse out into the community –  real and virtual. Long before President Obama drew WOOTS from the civic participation and open government junkies and threw the Washington bureaucrats into a frenzy with his talk of transparency, participation and collaboration, Betty Sue saw the connection between transparency and authentic public discourse. Almost three years ago she was assembling resources to enable Texas Forums and Silona Bonewald (League of Technical Voters) to assemble an amazing roomful of talented technologists committed to transparency in government that would enable people to be responsible, pro-active, and engaged citizens.

She wove together extensive networks of organizations concerned with issues – Texas Health Institute and the Center for Health and Social Policy, for example – and demonstrated how their mission to address difficult issues could be better achieved by engaging the public in civil discourse in partnership with Texas Forums. The list of organizations that have partnered with the library as a result of her vision for Texas Forums is long, but I will research our history and post them later so that you can appreciate the scope of her vision.

I know that many of you will want to send your regards and good wishes to Dr. Flowers and join me in thanking her for her vision and leadership. You may do so in the comments section of this blog where they will be collected for her to enjoy well into her next adventure.

_________________________________________________________________

LBJ Foundation Logo

AUSTIN, Texas-Dr. Betty Sue Flowers, director of the Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum since 2002, is leaving that post effective May 22, 2009, the Lyndon Baines Johnson Foundation announced Feb. 18.

“After seven wonderful years at the LBJ Library and Museum, I have decided to move on to other adventures and opportunities,” Dr. Flowers said.

“It’s been such an honor and pleasure to serve as the director of this flagship presidential library, and I’m sure I would have been happy to continue serving into the indefinite future. But it’s always been my philosophy that it’s good for an institution to adapt to new leadership-and for a leader to face new challenges.”

Tom Johnson, chairman of the Lyndon Baines Johnson Foundation, said he is grateful for the wonderful leadership Dr. Flowers has provided at the Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum. Johnson applauded the distinction, class and loyalty she has displayed as director.

“Dr. Flowers has earned the respect and the admiration of our board, her many colleagues in the entire presidential library system, historians and scholars who use the Library, and The University of Texas community,” Johnson said. “We will be cheering the next chapter in the accomplished life of Dr. Betty Sue Flowers.”

Johnson praised the many initiatives launched during Dr. Flowers’ tenure at the Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum, including the Presidential Timeline of the 20th Century project, a Web-based resource that opens to the public the rich archives of historical documents and artifacts from the nation’s presidential libraries. Johnson said the project “will serve future generations with an amazing collection of historical information about U.S. presidents and the times they experienced.”

Other initiatives undertaken during Dr. Flowers’ seven years as director include the release of recorded phone conversations from the Johnson administration; activities commemorating President Johnson’s 100th birthday; the tribute to Lady Bird Johnson; and repair of the LBJ Plaza at the Library and Museum.

Dr. Flowers said: “Thanks to the generous support of the LBJ Foundation, many of my dreams for the Library and the reputation of its great president have come true.”

Dr. Flowers became director of the Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum in 2002. Before that, she was the Joan Negley Kelleher Centennial Professor in the English Department at The University of Texas at Austin, as well as a Piper Professor and a member of the University’s Academy of Distinguished Teachers. During her tenure at The University of Texas, she also was associate dean of graduate Studies and director of the Plan II Honors Program.

Dr. Flowers is a native Texan with degrees from The University of Texas and the University of London.

Dr. Flowers was a consultant for the nationally televised series “The Power of Myth” and a host for the radio series “The Next 200 Years.” Her 10-part television series, “Conversation with Betty Sue Flowers,” aired on the Austin PBS affiliate, KLRU.

About the Lyndon Baines Johnson Foundation

The Lyndon Baines Johnson Foundation is responsible for managing gifts that benefit two institutions at The University of Texas at Austin-the Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum and the Lyndon Baines Johnson School of Public Affairs.

As one of only 12 presidential libraries in the country, the Library was established to preserve and make available for research the papers and memorabilia of President Lyndon Baines Johnson.

The mission of the School is to prepare graduate students for leadership positions, to organize public policy research, to provide continuing education for professionals, and to foster community involvement.

For more information, visit www.lbjfoundation.org.

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[update: Kevin Koym link repaired. Who knew you needed that pesky little http:// thingy?]

We are mid-way through South by Southwest film, interactive and music conference and festival here in Austin. I personally just survived five days of SXSW Interactive also attended by several Texas Forums friends like Charles Knickerbocker, Bijoy Goswami, Kevin Koym, David Swedlow, Silona Bonewald, Sunni Brown, Terry Crain, and Jon Lebkowsky. You have two more days to catch the SXSW film festival, but if your budget is a bit strapped, here’s another FREE alternative at the LBJ Library:

Who: Public is invited to a Science Fiction Film Festival featuring the Alamo Drafthouse Rolling Roadshow – Free admission and free Amy’s Ice Creams*

What: Bring your dinner and a blanket, and enjoy music and a family-friendly classic drive-in style movie under the stars.**

Where: LBJ Library
2313 Red River
Free Parking

When: Friday, March 27th
5 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.
– Tour the LBJ Library exhibit, To the Moon: The American Space Program in the 1960s, and receive a ticket for Amy’s Ice Creams – 4th floor, LBJ Library
6 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. – Enjoy music by the Rockit Scientists – real rocket scientists from the Johnson Space Center – LBJ Library Lawn
8 p.m. – Alamo Drafthouse Rolling Road Show presents “The War of the Worlds” (1953 version) – LBJ Library Lawn

Saturday, March 28th – Triple Feature Sci Fi Saturday
Inside LBJ Library – Third Floor Theater
10 a.m. – Alamo Drafthouse presents “Forbidden Planet”
1 p.m. – Alamo Drafthouse presents “When Worlds Collide”
3 p.m. – Alamo Drafthouse presents “Earth vs. the Flying Saucers”

Contact: Anne Wheeler
721-0216 or anne.wheeler@nara.gov

Websites: www.lbjlibrary.utexas.edu
www.originalalamo.com

(Austin) – The LBJ Library and Alamo Drafthouse are partnering to present music and a movie under the stars and a weekend of Sci-Fi movie adventures. All events are free and open to the public.

Enjoy the Library’s current exhibit, To the Moon: The American Space Program in the 1960s and an art show, Alan Bean: First Artist to Visit Another World.

*Advance tickets are available beginning March 18th at the LBJ Library from 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. daily.
**No alcoholic beverages

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To celebrate LBJ’s 100th birthday and the 40th anniversary of Apollo 11, the LBJ Library and Museum presents an important topic: Return to the Moon, a panel discussion on America’s next mission.

The panel will feature Alan Bean, artist, fourth man to walk on the moon and an artist whose works are on exhibit at the LBJ Library, and U.T. graduate; Lee Morin, astronaut; and NASA officials currently working on the moon project.

When: Tuesday, January 27, 2009 6:00 – 7:30 p.m.
Where: Frank Erwin Center, Lone Star Room
Cost: Free, open to the general public Tickets are required and will be available at LBJ Library beginning Jan. 20, 2009.

Panelists:

  • Alan Bean – artist, fourth man to walk on the moon, and U.T. Aerospace Engineering graduate
  • Lee Morin – astronaut, currently working on the cockpit of NASA’s newest spacecraft, the Crew Exploration Vehicle
  • Clinton Dorris – Deputy Project Manager for NASA’s Lunar Lander (Altair), Johnson Space Center
  • Matthew Leonard – Deputy Manager, Lunar Surface System Project Office, Johnson Space Center Moderator: Jeffrey A. Davis – EVA suit design for lunar missions, Johnson Space Center

Public reception to follow in the Great Hall at the LBJ Library.

Visit the Library’s exhibit, To the Moon: The American Space Program in the 1960s and the art show, Alan Bean: First Artist to Visit Another World.

Co-sponsors include: The University of Texas Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics Department, Texas Space Grant Consortium, University of Texas Center for Space Research, and Southwest Airlines.

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On December 4, the LBJ Presidential Library released the last of the audio-taped conversations with President Johnson from May 1968 – January 1969, his last few months in office. The tapes begin with a conversation with Ted Sorenson asking him to convey his sorrow to the Kennedy family for the shooting of Robert Kennedy and President Johnson’s plans to provide special security for each Presidential candidate and their families. It ends on January 2, 1969 with his conversation with Russell Long from the LBJ Ranch in which President Johnson expressed concern that Senator Kennedy’s effort to replace Senator Long as the the Democratic WHIP would split the Democratic party.

1968 was a watershed year in American history, and the final months of President Johnson’s administration were filled with turbulence and crises. Here are some highlights:

  • discussions of the negotiations with the North Vietnamese at the Paris peace talks
  • the fight within the Democratic Party among the candidates for the presidential nomination
  • the decision on October 31, 1968–just days before the presidential election–to end all bombing of North Vietnam
  • the assassination of Senator Robert Kennedy in June 1968
  • the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia in August 1968
  • dissension and rioting at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago
  • the presidential campaigns of Hubert Humphrey, Richard Nixon, and George Wallace

These events come to life in the recordings of his telephone conversations.

Below is the CBS coverage of the release

__________________________
Text of the CBS coverage of the release of President Johnson Tapes

Watch the CBS Coverage

LBJ Tapes Show Frustration Over Vietnam
WASHINGTON, Dec. 4, 2008

(CBS) New audio tapes were released Thursday from the final months of Lyndon Johnson’s presi-dency four decades ago. They reveal a leader wrestling with the Vietnam war – and very much in-volved in the 1968 presidential campaign, even after he decided not to run, CBS News senior White House correspondent Bill Plante reports.

Forty years before Democrats nominated their first candidate of color, President Lyndon Johnson told 1968 presidential nominee Hubert Humphrey that he should pick a Japanese-American as his running mate.

It was Sen. Daniel Inouye, who was awarded a silver star in World War II, and who lost an arm in battle.

“He answers Vietnam with that empty sleeve. He answers your problems with Nixon with that empty sleeve. He has that brown face,” Johnson said.

Humphrey, though he was one of the Senate’s foremost liberals, balked.

“I guess maybe, it’s just taking me a little too far, too fast,” Humphrey said. “Old, conservative Humphrey.”

The Vietnam War was tearing the country apart. Democrats wanted their convention platform to call for a halt to U.S. bombing.

From his Texas ranch, Johnson – whose son-in-law was serving in Vietnam – told an aide “no way.”

“I’m telling ’em what our position is as Commander-in-Chief that I’m not about to stop this bombing unless they arrest me and take my power away from me,” he said. “Because I’ve got some of my own right there and I’m not gonna shoot ’em in the heart. Not for a bunch of goddamn draft dodg-ers.”

Johnson got his way, but the convention in Chicago was a disaster. He listened without comment as his attorney general, Ramsey Clark, blamed the police.

“It was a very disgusting moment in my judgment, Mr. President,” Clark said. “I think it was caused by law enforcement.”

But Johnson, who sympathized with Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley, was having problems with his attorney general.

“Well, he doesn’t see this as you and I see it,” Johnson said

Daley argued that his police had been provoked.

“What are you gonna do if someone hits you with human manure in the face, are you gonna stand there?” Daley said.

Johnson did halt the bombing just before the election, which was extremely close. The morning af-ter, Humphrey called to apologize for losing.

“I’m sorry I let you down a little,” he said.

Johnson replied: “No you didn’t, no you didn’t, it’s on a lot of other folks but not you. It’s our own people in the party that created all the problems.”

Today’s tapes were the final release of Lyndon Johnson’s phone calls – recordings that have pro-vided an extraordinary insight into his presidency. Since LBJ, no politician has controlled the party so completely – and none is likely to do it ever again.

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For the upcoming NCDD Conference in Austin October 3-5, I’m doing two workshops – one on libraries and extension using dialogue, and one on the Missouri River Ecosystem Restoration Project. I am hosting a tech meeting, conducting a pre-conference with four colleagues, running a hospitality suite, sponsoring a poetry slam, videotaping events, blogging on site, and planning two tables for the marketplace. Like all of the dedicated volunteers on the Central Texas planning team, I have a crazy, crazy amount of work to do.

So how am I spending my time?

Contemplating goodie bag stuffing, of course! (Hey, it’s labor day weekend. This is about as much time off as I’ll get for the next three months.)

I’m stealing from the LBJ Library staff idea to have jelly beans at the LBJ 100 Celebration last Wednesday. (President Johnson’s gift to the Head Start kids he visited at Stonewall.)

So below are a couple of options. I need some advice. Which way to go??

Option 1

Option 1

This option is very cute, but also time consuming – punching the cards and cutting and tying the raffia. It also has the added expense of the blue raffia.

Option 2

Option 2

This option is in a resealable bag which is nice since people probably won’t eat 2 oz. of jelly beans at once. It’s also easier and lies flat in the bag.

I’m also looking for cheap options for jelly beans. I’ll need about 50 lbs. of jelly beans!

OK, now back to serious work – finishing uploading my photos from the LBJ 100 Celebration.

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We are only nine days away from the 100th celebration of the birthday of President Johnson next Wednesday, August 27. During this countdown, I have been monitoring the important events of his life as documented by the LBJ 100th Centennial Celebration. On this day in 1964, President Johnson signed the Hill-Burton Act which provided resources to build hospitals, mental health facilities, medical and dental schools and to support the education of future doctors, nurses and dentists.

As I read his comments at the signing, I am struck by how the same issues he tried to address in 1964 are still with us in 2008.

On this day in August 1964, President Johnson signed a bill extending the Hill-Burton Act.

The President said,

We have many new hospitals today in cities that are large and small. But many of our most important hospitals are too old. The hospitals which serve more than two-thirds of our population in nearly 200 metropolitan areas are obsolete, are out of date, are desperately in need of modernization. This legislation that I am signing today will help us get started on that long overdue job. …

The Hill-Burton hospital construction program has been extended another 5 years, but Congress has also provided assistance for constructing mental health facilities, mental retardation facilities, the medical and dental schools that we need.

And Congress has helped to meet our health manpower needs by a program to overcome our critical shortage of nurses, a program to train more graduate public health personnel, and by providing assistance to students attending medical and dental and nursing schools.

We are supporting, as no nation on earth has ever supported, the strength of our medical profession. We are supporting them with modern facilities, with more and better trained manpower, and productive research in more and more fields. I believe that we are pursuing a sensible and yet a most responsible course.

Texas Forums will host forums on The Cost of Health Care on October 7, 2008 at the LBJ Library Atrium on the 10th floor from 6:00 – 8:30. We will be using the National Issues Forums discussion guide, Coping with the Cost of Health Care: How Do We Pay for What We Need? From 6:00 – 6:30 our partners will be on hand with information about health care in Texas. So far, we are partnering with the following organizations and our list is growing:

Our colleagues at the University of Houston Downtown Center for Public Deliberation will be holding forums on this same issue on September 18, 2008 giving us a glimpse into how Texans in two different communities are thinking about the cost of health care and possible remedies that they would be willing to support. This will provide talking points that our partners can use to inform the Texas Legislature about the concerns of Texans who come together to deliberate this critical issue.

On the national front, dozens of Public Policy Institutes in the National Issues Forums network and all twelve Presidential Libraries will also be hosting forums on Coping with the Cost of Health Care. The results of these forums will be reported in a national report commissioned by the Kettering Foundation and prepared by Public Agenda.

If you would like more information about these upcoming forums or about partnering with us to encourage public forums on this critical issue, contact Taylor L. Willingham at taylor [at] austin-pacific. [dot] com or leave a comment here.

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